Quilting Project

After Christmas last year, 4 girls decided that we wanted to make our own quilt. And so, we went to book some lessons and bought some clothes. Thankfully, 4 of us can form a class and we don't have to follow a fixed schedule. Initially, the teacher estimated that we would need 5 lessons, but we ended up finishing our quilt after 7 lessons.

Even before our first lesson, we had homework to do, which was to wash all the cloth and iron them. We need to pre-wash the cloth before cutting and sewing them. This is to prevent them from getting out of shape after piecing them together.


For the design we plan to make, we need 1 yard of white cotton cloth and 9 pieces of fat/long quarters (cotton).


Lesson 1 - Cutting
We were taught how to measure and cut the clothes into stripes. And that's all we managed to achieve after 2.5 hours (super not efficient at all).




Lessons 2 & 3 - Patchwork
Next, we sew together the stripes of different lengths. The short ends are joined together first, forming the long horizontal stripes, which should (theoretically) be of the same length. But as you can see from the picture below, they are not. Thus, when we pin the long sides before sewing, we need to pin the most right and most left ends first, then work towards the center. And when we sew the long stripes together, we should sew rows 1 and 2 together (let's call this piece A), then sew rows 3 and 4 (B), then rows 5 and 6 (C), then rows 7 and 8 (D) and so on until we reach the last row at the bottom. After that, we sew pieces A and B together, and pieces C and D together, etc. We do this until all the stripes are sewn together.



Homework: Trace the applique outline on the freezer paper and prepare the cloth for the applique (see picture below). Our applique design have stripes of different fabric prints.




Lesson 4 - Applique
Iron the freezer paper cut-out onto the back of the applique cloth. Cut the cloth along the edge of the freezer paper, leaving a small allowance. Fold and iron down the cloth edges, then use big stitches to keep them in position. Pin and sew the applique to the main patchwork. As you can see from the rightmost photo, we were told to start sewing from the curve of the applique. When we are almost back at the start point, we remove the big stitches (that were meant to hold the edges folded in). Then we remove the freezer paper through the small opening. Finally, we close up the opening, which in our case is between the two pins at the right-bottom of the balloon. It's easier to sew up the opening along this straight part of the balloon. The applique would easily go out of shape if we try to sew the last part along the curve. We repeat the same steps for the brown basket.




Lesson 5 - Basting
The ropes of the hot air balloons were sewn with two strands of cross-stitch threads. As for the technique, I've already forgotten how it should be done already. Once all the appliques are attached, we can go on to do basting. We lay the patchwork (facing up) on top of the minky (facing down) and we use safety pins to keep the two layers in place.


Lesson 6 - Quilting
We did machine quilting by sewing along the ditch where fabric pieces are joined (only the ditch on the two sides, not those between the white pieces). We also did quilting along the outline of the applique and some clouds on the remaining white spaces.


Lesson 7 - Binding
The very last step in this project is to make the bias tape and bind it on the perimeter of the quilt. With the quilt lay open on the table, ensuring that the corners are right angle, we cut off the extra cloth and minky on the sides. My bias tape was made from 1/2 yard of grey cloth, but again, I totally cannot recall the steps on how to do it now. But there are plenty of tutorials and videos to re-learn if I want to do another one. The bias tape is machine sewn on the front of the quilt, while hand-sewn on the back.

My final product!

This is just a sketchy overview of "how to make a quilt". There are definitely many details and tips that I've missed out here. From our first lesson to my very last stitch, I took 2.5 months to complete this project. Quilting is not just time-consuming, the tools are quite costly too. Definitely going to work on a simpler quilting project next time!

HUMAN+

The HUMAN+ The Future of Our Species exhibition is held at the ArtScience Museum. I was expecting a more scientific kind of exhibition, but there are a number of artworks showing what it could be like for the future of mankind.


Chapter 1: Augmented Ability

The exhibition starts with the showcase of prosthetics, which is something that is familiar to us and we see them very often in our everyday lives, even if we are not a user of one.



In the next room, artworks of overlaid photos were put up on the wall and they give me a headache when I looked at them. Then, there's also a series of scary photos (behind the orange panels) showing Stelarc' surgery, where a "ear" is constructed onto his forearm. Next, we move into a dark room and videos of Stelarc's works with robotics are screened on the walls. In fact, right at the entrance to this exhibition, there is another video showing him strapped to a robot arm. There's also a video about the Harlequin’s Coat that consist living cells taken from different species. These are not quite the kind of artwork I know how to appreciate even though they are very much technology-based.

The sculptures of the Sonochromatic Head and Seismic Arm bring us back to a more real application of technology. Neil Harbisson is recognised as the world's first cyborg because of the implanted antenna in his skull that helps him "see" colours.


Chapter 2: Encountering Others


Those rows of eyeballs on the right (in the picture) are designed to follow the visitors who walk pass. And in the background, you can tickle the "feet" or squeeze the "hand" to get a "response" from the guy in the screen.


Would any parent like to have this robot arm rock their baby in this crib?


Human Version - photographic works of Yves Gellie


Chapter 3: Authoring Environment


The Human Pollination Project - An artist's solution to the decreasing honeybee population.



Pick up the phone and it will read to you the story of the specimen, otherwise, you can read the card yourself.


The genetic design of the fictional Beamer Bees.


Chapter 4: Life At The Edges


Sculptures of babies, each with a modification to deal with potential future problem, such as global warming.


Semi-Loving Worry Dolls - an art in tissue culture.


The magnified photos of the worry dolls.


Nadine the female humanoid social robot. I watched some visitors speaking with her through the mic and I think it's more fun talking to Siri.


Soon, a second humanoid social robot named Charlie will be created.

PARKROYAL on Beach Road

We're back in another PARKROYAL hotel again. KB and I just had our wedding anniversary staycation in PARKROYAL on Pickering just few months back. This time, we're here at PARKROYAL on Beach Road for KB's cousin's wedding lunch and the family and relatives decided to enjoy a hotel stay for the night. (Don't have to worry about drinking too much alcohol during the banquet.) In all, we occupied 9 rooms excluding the bridal suite.


Hotel lobby


Sitting are at the lift lobby on the 7th floor

This is how our Orchid Club Premier Room look like:





Toiletries from St Gregory Spa


Mini bar


The Singapore Flyer can be seen from our room.


How about chillaxing at the balcony?


The gym here is much bigger than the one at Pickering.


The swimming pool, which never fails to keep the kids occupied.


The Orchid Club Lounge serves coffee, tea and cookie all day, breakfast from 7 to 10 am and evening cocktail from 6 to 8 pm. I wonder why they do not serve afternoon tea like the one at PARKROYAL at Pickering.







This kind of spread could have been our dinner, but we ended up eating at Golden Mile Food Centre instead (because the majority didn't take the Orchid Club rooms). Sigh, what a waste.

PARKROYAL on Pickering

This was where we had our Anniversary staycation, at PARKROYAL on Pickering! It's conveniently located near Chinatown MRT station, but we still drove there since there's complimentary parking anyway.


While waiting to check-in, we were served icy cold lime juice.


Walkway to the rooms on the 15th floor


Our room with king-size bed


Bathroom with the most-squarish bathtub I ever seen


Toilet and shower area


Complimentary drinking water and toiletries


Nespresso coffee machine and TWG tea bags provided


Complimentary red velvet cake


Orchid Club Lounge on the 16th floor serves afternoon tea from 2pm to 4pm


Coffee, tea or juice?





View from the Orchid Club Lounge on 16th floor. We have the same view from our room which is only one floor below the club.


Outdoor rooftop terraces on 16th floor


Gym on 5th floor


The always-very-crowded infinity swimming pool (also on 5th floor)


The quiet side of the 5th floor



Cabana for chilling out

After exploring the hotel, we decided to get changed and hit the gym. We would love to enjoy a dip in the pool, but it was crowded and all the pool-side loungers were occupied! Then, we showered and head down to the ground floor for dinner at Lime restaurant. Before calling it a day, we went back to the club lounge for another drink and to enjoy the night view of the city.


Enjoying a glass a champagne after breakfast

Champagne breakfast is served in the Orchid Club Lounge from 6:30am to 10:30am. But we chose to dine at the common breakfast area in Lime, where there's definitely a lot more food variety than in the club lounge.